Trail Tending and Stewardship of the mountains and our local crags is a valuable part of Mazama history. We are excited to continue this tradition today! There is no charge to participate in trail stewardship activities. Members and non-members are welcome to join us. Mazamas works in cooperation with the US Forest Service, Oregon and Washington State Parks and other local agencies in maintaining trail access for the climbing and hiking community.

 

Trail Maintenance

Our primary tasks are helping to keep open trails that have been damaged by storms, erosion and the whims of nature. We will go into trail areas at the behest of the Forest Service or other local agencies and augment re-building efforts and maintenance that is needed. We typically will go into a trail area and do such tasks as removing downed trees from blocking the trail, re-grading hiking paths covered by slides or washed away by erosion, re-routing paths around unstable ground, re-constructing access across streams and creeks, and general cleanup of branches, bushes, boulders and other path obstructions.

We supply tools for working on these trips. Such tools include rock rakes, pick-axes, pry bars, come-alongs, saws and loppers. Participants are expected to supply their own work clothes, (long pants!) leather gloves, boots, rain gear, food and water. Trips are within commuting distance to Portland. Each trip typically lasts four to eight hours. We try to schedule at least one trip per month and will add more trips if the need is there.  No experience is necessary.  As for most all Mazama activities, Trail Tending days are open to members and non-members alike. 


Trail Construction

A prime activity of the Mazamas in the early 90’s was the construction of the Mazama Trail on Mt. Hood. This was a project taken on as a centennial activity that provides new, well graded access to the Timberline Trail on the Northwest section of the mountain. We are working with the Forest Service in an ongoing effort to perform annual maintenance work on this trail (usually in August) to keep it clear and safe for all hikers to use.

In past years, the Mazamas were instrumental in creating and constructing trails such as Trapper Creek and Chetwoot. We currently have four adopted trails including the Mazama trail, Elk-King traverse, and several sections of trail in Trapper Creek and Forest Park.

Past Stewardship Work

Rooster Rock State Park: Repairs to climber trails
Broughton Bluff: Repairs to climber trails and replacing fixed anchors
Forest Park: Hiker trail tending 
Beacon Rock State Park: Repairs to climber trails and Technical Rock Climbing Advisory Committee representation to update Climbing Management Plan
Smith Rock State Park: Repairs to climber and hiker trails (Homestead w/TKO and Misery Ridge)
Adopted Trails: Mazama Trail (Mt. Hood - Cathedral Ridge) & Elk-Kings (Tillamook SF)
Columbia River Gorge: most recently Dog Mountain (w/WTA) and Nick Eaton Trail (w/PCTA)
Yosemite National Park, Climber Steward program: Repaired and restored climber trails